Student Teaching Reflection 2

Instruction: The teacher uses research-based instructional practices to meet the needs of all students. This standard reflects the importance of teachers thinking about individual student needs while creating lesson plans and activities. A teacher must ponder questions such as: “what do my students need help learning?” “how do my students best learn new material?” and “what types of learning activities will help all my students succeed?”

This week the Kindergarteners have been learning to read and write ten color words: green, blue, purple, red, yellow, orange, black, brown, white, and gray. According to Bennett and Desforges (1988), learning activities tend to be organized into four categories: incremental, practice, restructuring, and enrichment (as cited in Marzano, 2007, p. 175). The learning activities in this color word focus incorporated mostly incremental and practice tasks. A variety of tasks were planned so students were consistently involved in learning activities and developed a deeper level of comprehension through repeated practice and engagement (Marzano, 2007, p. 176). Throughout the week, students read color words in various subjects and texts, practiced writing color words during handwriting, and listened as color words were pronounced and spelled audibly. The next few pictures show a few examples of students working on different color word activities.

In Picture One, a student has finished practicing writing “black” in a Color Word Handwriting Packet I created for the students.

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Picture One

In Picture Two, a student is coloring the word “yellow” in a Color Reading Book my mentor teacher created.

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Picture Two

In Picture Three, a student points to the word “blue” while reading a book about the many colors in the ocean.

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Picture Three

The range of activities kept students engaged all week. By Thursday, I observed about five students who were fluently reading more common color words (blue, red, yellow, and green) in their books and some started incorporating these color words into their writing. I think planning multiple tasks throughout all subjects really helped all the students gain a deeper level of understanding. I also think it was really important to plan at least one activity a day that focused on color words. The activities reinforced what students had learned and provided opportunities for them to practice their new knowledge.

I was very impressed by the students’ growth within one week. If I had planned differently, I would have had students complete a color word preassessment. Then I could accurately assess how many additional color words all students learned this week instead of their success being based on my observation. In the future, I plan on teaching students number words so I will prepare an appropriate preassessment so then I can monitor students’ progress. Next week, the class will continue learning color words. I plan to include more handwriting activities so all students think about including colors as a detail into their writing and stories. One more change for next week is an increased focus on the less the common color words (black, brown, gray, and white) since those are the color words I observed all students need more exposure to learning.

Reference:

Marzano, R. J. (2007). The art and science of teaching: A comprehensive framework for effective instruction. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

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